The Poor Sink Further

“More and more, workers can no longer be exploited because they offer nothing worth exploiting. There will be no need for labour, and thus no need to exploit it. In a not-too-distant dystopian future where machines have supplanted labourers, the great bulk of humanity will be left idle and abjectly dependent—parasites who can only take because they have nothing to give.”

Jim Goad

Race is a Social Construct, So I’m a Poor Black Orphan

“Since race is merely an idea—a pinch of invisible magical dust held lightly between the thumb and forefinger—I can close my eyes, wiggle my nose, click my heels, and reconstruct myself as a black man of pure dark-chocolate 100% swampy sub-Saharan ancestry, and I don’t care if you like it or not. No, actually, I do care if you like it—in other words, I will MAKE you like it. And since none of you will be able to find my black parents, I will also register as an orphan, depending on whether I qualify for government assistance based on that status. I would think that being a poor black orphan would be worth—what?—at least $500 combined monthly from local agencies and President Obama’s personal stash? I can be whatever I want to be, and you can’t stop me, and that’s my right, and I’ll take it all the way to the Supreme Court, so don’t push me, or I will call you a hater and get you fired from your job.”

Jim Goad

Reparations

“The estimates I’ve seen regarding what the net value of black American slaves in 1860 would translate to in current dollars range from $1.75 trillion to $10 trillion. Writing in Forbes, some white guy reckons America’s net wealth is somewhere around $80 trillion, adding that ‘Even if slavery reparations are righteously due they would amount to around and about the current cost of food stamps.’ Since total American annual welfare spending is now around $1 trillion, and since the country has spent trillions in welfare since the 1950s, and since blacks chew up a disproportionate amount of welfare expenditures, it’s possible that the ‘reparations’ may have already been paid—with interest, even.”

Jim Goad